Search

DANCE NOTATION: AN INTEGRATION OF MOVEMENT AND MUSIC THROUGH SYMBOLS

Eduard Greyling, retired dancer and choreologist

This illustrated course provides a vivid exploration of some of the various methods of movement notation that became necessary to record dance throughout ballet history. Using the Benesh system of movement notation (known as Benesh Movement Notation – BMN or Benesh Choreology) the course will browse through the recording of ballet. It will also briefly discuss how the same graphic signs can be used for contemporary dance, African dance and other forms of movement. Issues of dynamics and recording the choreographer’s intentions are paramount in the life of a dance work. The course will touch on the topic of notation versus video and discuss the copyright issues involved in this.  The lecturer will demonstrate the dance steps and show their notation

 

LECTURE TITLES

1. The need for a movement notation to record dance

2. BMN basics: first movements in ballet

3. Contemporary dance and African dance movements

4. Recording dynamics of movements

5. Notation score versus video: capturing a choreographer’s intentions and copyright

 

Recommended reading

Artistic Panel, Royal Academy of Dance. 1997 The Foundation of Classical Ballet Technique. UK: MPG Books Ltd.

McGuinness-Scott, J. 1983 Movement Study and Benesh Movement Notation. London: Oxford University Press.

Benesh, R and J, 1977 (reprinted 1983) Reading Dance, The Birth of Choreology. London: Souvenir Press(Educational and Academic) Ltd.

Parker, M 1996. Benesh Movement Notation, Elementary Solo Syllabus. London: The Benesh Institute.

 

 

Time: 20–24 January
Date: 1.00 pm
COURSE FEES: Full R590.00 Staff & Students R295.00
Venue: LT3 Kramer Law Building, UCT